By Damon Markiewicz

SEAT (Social justice, Equity, Accountability, Transformation) at the Table Week is a conference of educational experiences across media, pedagogies, and practices, dedicated to deconstructing oppressive systems and transforming our community toward equity for all. The goal of SEAT at the Table is to educate our community on topics related to social justice, identity, power, privilege, positionality, and radical community care.

What’s It Like to Be a First 
Presented by Springfield College President Mary-Beth A. Cooper, PhD, DM, and Vice President for Inclusion and Community Engagement Calvin R. Hill
Cleveland E. and Phyllis B. Dodge Room (A&B), Flynn Campus Union

This interactive session facilitated by President Cooper and Vice President Hill will address the opportunities and challenges of being first. Topics of conversation will include President Cooper’s experience of being the first female president of Springfield College, as well as Hill’s thoughts on what it’s like to serve in an inaugural position. They also will explore local and national firsts, and what those firsts mean (from being a first-generation student, to the first BIPOC individual to serve as president of the United States).

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Dismantling the Dynamics of Racial Microaggressions 
Presented by Kushal Bhandari
Cleveland E. and Phyllis B. Dodge Room (A&B), Flynn Campus Union

As an international student, Kushal Bhandari has fallen victim to racial microaggressions at Springfield College, so he decided to speak on this sensitive yet significant topic. It is a form of racism that doesn’t produce noise and is often invisible to perpetrators. Intentional or unintentional, this form of racism hurts the sentiments of BIPOC. The primary goal of his discussion is to take apart the pieces of such microaggressions and discuss how they rejuvenate from something as rudimentary as a small joke and leads to offending someone. Moreover, the objective is to learn and discuss many ways to acknowledge and avoid such instances in the future.

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Addressing Anti-Blackness with Pan-Asian Communities (Virtual)
Presented by Jennifer Tarm

Even though the world was navigating the COVID-19 pandemic for the first time, historical racism has been an ongoing pandemic itself. With the rise of the Black Lives Matter (BLM) movement, the summer of 2020 sparked a racial reckoning for the Asian and Asian American and Pacific Islander (AAPI) communities. During this time, API/AAPI communities were confronted with its cultural history of internalized racism and anti-Blackness as well as analyzing the perpetuation of white supremacy. This introductory session will highlight some historical roots and sociocultural contributions to anti-Blackness within the API/AAPI communities and culture. Various social justice frameworks will also be introduced as approaches to challenging and dismantling the systems of white supremacy and anti-blackness.

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Resilience: Past, Present, Future of Gynecology 
Presented by Mikaili Charlemagne
Cleveland E. and Phyllis B. Dodge Room (A&B), Flynn Campus Union

This presentation will explore the development of gynecology and its modern-day implications for women of color. It will also include a discussion about the role that discrimination plays in modern gynecology, and maternal and child health statistics.

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50 Years of Gender Equity on Campus: An Exploration of Title IX (Virtual)
Presented by Erin Leeper

in 1972, Title IX of the Education Amendments was passed by congress to eliminate discrimination based on sex in education programs. Over the last 50 years, colleges and universities have seen a shift in opportunities across their programs for students who identify as women, transgender, and non-binary as a direct result. this session will provide an overview of the major historical advancements for sex/gender equity on campus interwoven with the effects of the ever-changing legal landscape and end with an eye towards the future of creating placecs of belonging for all students.

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Black Fatigue: How Racism is Destroying Black Bodies (Virtual)
Presented by Danielle Farrar 

This presentation is intended to bring about awareness of the dangers of “Black fatigue.” Danielle Farrar will give an overview of Black fatigue and will address how the chronic stress of experiencing racism is playing a major role in the health disparities associated with the Black community. Specifically, the presentation will show how chronic racial stress is linked to increased rates of diabetes and heart disease in Black individuals. It is Farrar’s hope that in bringing attention to this fatal issue, it will spark an interest in redefining the Black health narrative.

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Save Our Spoons: Grind Culture and the Disabled Community 
Presented by Randi Berry, Wyatt deFriesse, and Kenny Dalton 
Cleveland E. and Phyllis B. Dodge Room (A&B), Flynn Campus Union

Staying fed, daily hygiene, and attending class: completing all of those tasks is a daily balancing act for some members of the Springfield College community. Join us to learn about the Spoon Theory relating to managing chronic illness and disability, try your hand at a triage of daily living needs with our interactive Save Our Spoons activity, and learn about the impacts that toxic productivity and “grind culture” can have on the disabled community and the Springfield College community at large.

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Discrit (Disability Studies in Education and Critical Race Theory): Examining the Intersections of Disability and Race (Virtual)
Presented by Sara Scribner and Brianna Dickens 

During this session, the presenters will outline DisCrit as a critical theoretical framework, illustrate one example of these intersections using federal educational data, and engage participants in an interactive application of the theory through scenario consideration. Participants will leave this session with a deeper understanding of DiCrit and how race and disability intersect.

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The Social Justice History of Springfield College 
Presented by Martin Dobrow
Cleveland E. and Phyllis B. Dodge Room (A&B), Flynn Campus Union

Springfield College is way more than just the Birthplace of Basketball. The school has a longstanding history of social justice aspiration. At times, we have lived up to the ambitions words in our mission about “leadership in service to humanity.” At times, we have fallen short. This presentation will take a long, historical view to explore the sometimes remarkable experience with social justice of the College. The selective history is far from exhaustive, but it will focus on some of the Springfield Colege inspirational social justice leaders, from the school’s founding right through the present day.

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To Heal: A Discussion on Race, Law, Education, and Teaching 
Presented by Greg Coogan 
Cleveland E. and Phyllis B. Dodge Room (A&B), Flynn Campus Union

This session will feature a discussion on how American law has been historically used to oppress people of color; how law and policy are wielded to perpetuate racism, inequality, and injustice within the education system; and how restorative justice and trauma-informed pedagogy can be foundational tools of healing, love, and community.

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Unraveling Misconceptions of Hair: Micro-agressions and Post Historical Trauma (Virtual)
Presented by Simone Alter Muri and Naarah Macklin

The purpose of this workshop is to expand knowledge of how microaggressions affect minority groups and the connection to post-historical trauma. Microaggressions are examined in this workshop through the stereotypes about hair. Hair can be a symbol of identity and a vehicle for discrimination and internalized oppression. This is especially true in African American and BIPOC communities. Presenters address and explore the topic of hair, in relationship to race and post-historical trauma. The presenters share examples from contemporary artists, and their own experiences. Participants learn how visual art can be a catalyst to begin conversations, bring awareness to cultural identity, and address microaggressions.

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Emancipation of Our Minds: A Therapy Session for People of Color
Presented by Paris Lizana 
Cleveland E. and Phyllis B. Dodge Room (A&B), Flynn Campus Union 

Based on Ibram X. Kendi’s book Stamped from the Beginning, this lecture and discussion will explore the ways in which white supremacy influences the actions of people of color and how they take a toll on how we present ourselves in society. Paris Lizana’s goal is for people of color to walk away feeling relieved of the burden of representing their entire race in the spaces they enter and feel that they can be themselves without being enslaved to the idea of perfection. This lecture and discussion will showcase a brief history of how white supremacy has created this invisible pressure for people of color to be their best all the time abd suggest ways to reject these ideals.

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My Community Does Not Look Like Me 
Presented by Sue Scheppele 
Cleveland E. and Phyllis B. Dodge Room (A&B), Flynn Campus Union

This session will help participants make sense of and explain bias. Participants will explore the various aspects of identity; reflect how identity consciously shapes one’s worldview; and apply this understanding to recognize the relationship between identity, bias, and power. Participants, through hands-on activities, will also recognize the value of diversity in society; adopt a vocabulary for speaking about differences, prejudice, and discrimination; and develop strategies to communicate across differences.

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Intergenerational Trauma and YOU (Virtual)
Presented by Deepashree Karve 

Intergenerational trauma is often identified in marginalized communities and underrepresented populations. Students belonging to racially marginalized communities, from the underserved population, or even children of immigrants often get confused about their struggles and fail to understand where their trauma is coming from. Deepashree Karve wants to create awareness about intergenerational trauma and how valid that in in underrepresented minorities.

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